Friday, September 2, 2016

September rez Posted

Read in September rez in Issuu:

https://issuu.com/rezslmagazine/docs/september_2016
It’s almost unbelievable that it’s been 15 years since 9/11, yet this milestone is upon us. Jullianna Juliesse helps us remember those who perished on that ignominious day with her piece, Numbers. rez Magazine also honors those fallen heroes with this issue.  But we have so much to celebrate as well, including [muse] dance company’s production of Fiddler on the Roof, which premieres at Origen’s Chinese Playhouse on the September 15th, and also opens at the [muse] Theatre on September 25th. Figure out a way, by hook or by crook, to see this fantastic entertainment.  Cyberphoria came out of nowhere to bring us a look at The Monument, where we’re reminded that nothing is safe, nothing is reliable. Should we be afraid, or should we just eat more dark chocolate? Lisa Launay joins our pages with a thought-provoking piece, The Little Voices. I’m inclined to listen to Lisa’s voices and recommend that you do also.  You all know the sublime poetry of Rusty (RoseDrop Rust), but lately we’ve been featuring his short fiction, and this month we offer The Cabin Boy, which settles Rusty as one of the preeminent writers we have here in the metaverse. Our favorite Mariner Trilling remembers the difficulty of snagging that special pad with This Apartment, which reminds us how much we love his contributions. Flynt Firebrand questions the misunderstood vanilla bean in his wonderful poem, Vanilla. Cat Boccaccio has stopped asking her questions and is now giving her answers, this month with Unpredictable, a short confection that makes us yearn for more. And lastly, when you’re whitewater rafting down difficult passages with no food, and someone offers you peyote buttons instead, what do you do? Consuela Hypatia Caldwell offers one obvious response. Enjoy!  


Tuesday, August 2, 2016

August rez Posted

Read the August rez in Issuu:

https://issuu.com/rezslmagazine/docs/august_2016



For this month’s cover story, Jami Mills interviews GlitterPrincess Destiny about her art piece, Born in Kurdistan, where the artist captures the amazing images of girls at war against ISIS. It’s difficult to call them girls, as they are feared soldiers of the Peshmerga, itself one of the most ferocious of fighting forces. Glitter brings home the anguish and loneliness of war, a fight for survival against a brutal enemy. Her show will be up through the latter part of August and we recommend it to you.  Ripley Fourneau joins us for the first (and hopefully not the last) time with a crisp and insightful piece about Augmentalism, Immersionism, and her own concept of Escapism. All very rewarding reading and extremely thoughtful and well written.  An issue of rez wouldn’t be complete without an article by our very own Art Blue (perhaps plagiarized from his AI owl, Neruval), and this month we have Cybereddie Go, wherein Art chases the elusive Lampas in true Pokemon style.  Flynt Firebrand brings us an exquisite poem, Hounded, about the relentless march of memories. In Third Grade, Mariner Trilling hilariously takes us back to those halcyon days of grade school.  Spoiler Alert: Mariner swings a mean lunchbox! Jullianna Juliesse contributes two short poems this month, the first being Rebuilding Me, where piece by piece, Julie reconnects herself, and the second being Unhinged, a wonderful poem about another unnamed station.  Cat Boccaccio is back this month with a companion piece to last month’s The Accident, this time re-introducing us to Lily-Rose Roades in Pensive, a beautiful short work. Wu is back for her third installment of the scintillating she rezzed #3. We hope she continues to bring us more of her unique perspective.  Adrian Blair also returns with a nostalgic poem about Parisian yearnings. And closing out this month’s issue is a lovely poem by Huckleberry Hax called That Word.  I hope you enjoy reading this issue as much as we enjoyed printing it. 

https://issuu.com/rezslmagazine/docs/august_2016

Tuesday, July 5, 2016

July rez Posted

read the July rez in Issuu:

https://issuu.com/rezslmagazine/docs/july_2016


As we enter the summer months, we’re always looking for some fast-paced reading.  This month is just the cure for the summertime reading blues.  We start off with the second half of The Egg by Art Blue, this piece called The Egg Becoming Alpha.  Art continues his exploration of the future, where all of us are going, but few others than Art have ever been.  Art continues to dazzle us and make us scratch our heads.  Please enjoy the month’s omelet.  Wu, who began her exciting series, she rezzed, has brought us the second in her series (#2), where we bask in her sumptuous imagery.  We’re looking forward to a long collaboration with Wu.  RoseDrop Rust, who has contributed so many wondrous poems to rez, takes his hand at a short story, and what a story it is.  Fabulous.  We’ve been hoping for a long time that Adrian Blair would contribute another of his stunning poems, this one being Ellipsis, which is a moving piece, full of the tenderness of the human heart.  Cat Boccaccio, who you know so well from earlier issues, is back with an exquisite piece of short fiction, The Accident.  We’re looking forward to hearing a lot more from Cat in future issues.  And bringing the July issue to a close is another beautiful poem by Wolfgang Glinka entitled The Blueberry Cage. I hope you enjoy reading this issue as much as we’ve loved putting it together for you.  Enjoy your summer reading! 


https://issuu.com/home/docs/july_2016/edit/links

Thursday, June 2, 2016

June rez Posted

read the June issue of rez in Issuu:
 
https://issuu.com/rezslmagazine/docs/june_2016


We dedicate this month’s issue of rez Magazine to one of the giants in the world of poetry, Stosh Quartz, who passed away this past month.  She touched so many people here, poets and dreamers alike. We’ve reprinted on of her poems, A Young Woman’s Death, which both saddens and uplifts at the same time. She will be missed.  We also introduce this month Wu, who will be writing a series called She Rezzed for as many months as her nimble fingers hold out.  Art Blue returns from the future bearing gifts, this month in the form of a wonderful story called The Egg. This is Part One of a two-part series that will conclude in the July issue.  Elegy: A Matter of Quartz is a tribute to Stosh beautifully composed by Grail Arnica. Jami Mills explores the state-of-the-art in computer gaming technology, following the exploits of IBM’s Deep Blue and Google’s AlphaGo.  She finally ends up at SL’s Go sim, Kido, to bask in its beauty and even picked up a game too.  Neeva Torok is another first-time contributor, who has given us a lovely poem entitled Words and Prims.  We look forward to many more collaborations in future issues.  Bed Blanket is the latest piece by RoseDrop Rust, who muses about unkempt beds. Lucky I’m in Love With My Best Friend is a particularly poignant piece by DonJuan Writer, who knew Stosh better than anyone. Consuela Hypatia Caldwell follows up this month with an essay about abstract art, which as you know from last month’s feature, she has such an affinity for. And lastly, serene bechir closes the June issue with a stunning poem, “Poem With Chain Saw Backing.” Please enjoy this special memorial issue of rez.




 
https://issuu.com/rezslmagazine/docs/july_2016

Tuesday, May 3, 2016

May rez Posted

Read the May issue of rez in issuu:
https://issuu.com/rezslmagazine/docs/may_2016








 









Welcome to the May issue of rez Magazine. We are particularly proud to present the spectacular images of Consuela Hypatia Caldwell, with all of their colorful exuberance, texture and vitality.  You’ll remember Consuela from earlier publications featuring her poetry and prose.  Jami Mills interviews the artist about the intensity of her images and the stunning use of color and texture in her photographs. Not only does Consuela give some thoughtful insights into her work, but Jami has curated a handful of her favorite photographs so you’ll know what everyone is so excited about. We would also like to welcome Romie Vella to rez, who introduces herself to our readers with a beautifully crafted poem about things falling apart. We look forward to many future contributions from this unique talent. Ray Blue, who took over after Art Blue’s untimely demise, follows up on his story, The Swimmer, in last month’s issue with a complicated and staggering piece this month called The Lady in Black. Jullianna Juliesse shares the age-old argument between Prudence and Lust. If that doesn’t pique your interest, then you’ll need to read Mariner Trilling’s romantic poem, The Most Seductive Thing I Wrote Today. Very much at the top of his game, Mariner muses about the object of his affection.  Zari takes a moment from her chores as a kajira in Gor (the Jon Norman-inspired land of mystery) to explain what it’s really like being a slave in the primitive but very sophisticated world of Gor.  In Boy’s I’d Like to Fuck #1 – Phil Burke, Merope Madrigal describes her yearning for another young lad with whom she would like to have her way.  And closing out the May issue, Flynt Firebrand gives us a poem about impermanence and how the house always seems to win. We hope you enjoying reading this issue as much as we enjoyed presenting these very exciting artists.  Enjoy.












 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Tuesday, April 5, 2016

April rez Posted

Read the April issue of rez in Issuu:
https://issuu.com/rezslmagazine/docs/april_2016/1?e=3570461/30000297


In this month’s issue, Jami Mills takes us inside the 2016 edition of one of the greatest virtual immersive entertainments ever, Le Cirque de Nui, chryblnd Scribe’s steampunk adaptation of Erin Morgenstern’s The Night Circus. We’ve featured this unique entertainment before (see August 2014 edition of rez in our archives), but the production is only getting better with time.  Congratulations to the entire Cirque crew for bringing us another installment of this mesmerizing and totally enchanting entertainment. May you continue to find new avenues to explore so we call all enjoy this show for years to come. We also hope you will enjoy Mario Zecca’s contribution, The Magniloquent Linguist, a poem that effectively uses the rhythms of the street, and in so doing, brings the street alive. In the sixth and final installment of her sci-fi thriller, Wishbone One, Jami Mills brings her short story to an exciting conclusion, wherein we learn of some of the pitfalls of prolonged space travel. Casey A is a heartachingly personal and poignant poem by longtime contributor and superb poet, Zymony Guyot. You’ll notice that Art Blue has not contributed this month. Instead, Ray Blue dazzles us with futuristic piece called The Swimmer. And just who is Ray Blue? You’ll need to read this futuristic piece to find out. Where or when we’ll ever hear from Art again is up for speculation. Perhaps his AI, Neruval, can be coaxed into explaining Art’s whereabouts. Jullianna Juliesse has written a dark piece, Fait Accompli, that causes us to question the quality and duration of our existence here. And finally, in Hummingbird Feeder, Wolfgang Glinka returns to our pages with a sultry poem about summers on the porch. Enjoy.


Thursday, March 3, 2016

March rez Posted

read the March issue of rez in Issuu:
 
https://issuu.com/rezslmagazine/docs/march_2016




















We can say with confidence that we’ve never had an issue quite like the March 2016 issue. It is a great coup that Mariner Trilling (whom you know for his wonderful poetry that we’ve had the privilege of publishing) has scored an interview not with Donald Trump, but with his unpredictable hair! As you might imagine, the unimaginable happens in The Hair Apparent.  Jullianna Juliesse contributes Surgery of the Soul, a difficult but deeply rewarding poem about survival. In a first for rez, Chris Mooney-Singh (aka Singh Albatros) not only brings us two wonderful pieces, but allows us to link them to audio files where our readers can hear him recite each piece in compelling fashion.  The first piece is a short poem, Chain Gang Ant, which adds to our view of the lowly ant, going about his business.  Jami Mills’ sci-fi thriller, Wishbone One, continues with the fifth installment, A Grateful Nation. Finally, our protagonist escapes the bounds of gravity with Grace, his always complicated and perplexing AI. The Still Not Known One (TSNKO) picks up where Art Blue leaves off with The Surreal Tower, which further explores themes we’ve grown to love so much: reality and the future. Consuela Hypatia Caldwell, who has graced our pages with her stunning work several times before, takes us to the white water of the Colorado Drainage in Spring of ‘84, where she reminisces about her earlier life as an expedition leader. You will feel the spraying water on your face and the churning river below your neoprene raft as Consuela brings the river alive. And closing this month’s issue is Singh Albatros’ second piece, a brilliant fable, Sleeping With Angels, also with an audio track link. We’re grateful for all of our blessings this month, and we hope you enjoy reading this wonderful issue.