Friday, July 3, 2015

July rez Posted

read the July issue of rez in Issuu:

This month’s issue is a watershed event, as it marks the last offering (CODE64 in Space) of Art Blue, learned futurist, virtual art archivist, and accomplished performance artist in his own right. His groundbreaking installment at LEA14, Moonrezzer, which has been featured in prior issues of rez, ended its run on June 29th.  Art felt it was only fitting for him to end his run as well on that sad day.  He did not want to call attention to himself, but neither did he want to linger after his opus work closed, preferring instead to “go out on top.”  Luminaries of the virtual art world bid him adieu and all that is now left of Art Blue is what is contained in all of Art’s code that Neruval (his AI owl) has scrupulously preserved.  There will never be another Art Blue.  We can only hope that some of his insightful talent survives in one form or another.  (Neruval, of course, knows more than he’s letting on.)  We are very fortunate to be able to introduce our readers to a new luminary of the written word, LunaAzulejo, whose tone poem, Salt Song, is achingly beautiful.  We’re hopeful that her story continues, as we’re certainly left wanting more from this phenomenal writer.  In her fascinating piece, The Byway Nigh Me, Cassie Parker pulls the curtain back on her process as she takes us behind the scenes into the first meeting of the Board of Trustees of her exciting new arts production company, TerpsiCorps ARTWerks.  As with everything that Cassie touches in both her worlds, she unapologetically insists on a commitment to excellence.  Her now-forming troupe intends to launch its first performance in September. For those readers who have ever pondered what the Gor experience is all about, you’ll never read a more insightful description than in this month’s piece by zari, The Heart of a Gorean Slave. Bright, witty, articulate – zari helps us understand how she reconciles her own belief in the importance of empowering women with her personal yearnings to be a slave girl, subjugated by a male-dominated society. And after a hiatus, Jullianna Juliesse returns to rez with a wonderful poem, Your Sybarite. We couldn’t be happier that Julie is back, and I’m not the only one who is looking forward to some wonderful pieces from her in the future. Building a Show is Hitomi Tamatzui’s in-depth examination of dance in the virtual world, from staging to choreography and everything in between. Hitomi brings together dancers, designers and choreographers in a round table discussion of the challenges and joys of putting on a professional quality dance performance.  All in all, assembling this issue was both poignant and thrilling. I hope you enjoy it.

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